Tag Archives: defense

What to Do if a Debt Collector is Suing You

 If a debt collector is suing you, you may be intimidated or even panicked. You may be thinking about giving up, but that usually isn’t a good idea. You have an excellent chance to win if you will just fight a little bit. Defending yourself  isn’t that hard.

If They Have Already Filed Suit

If you are already in a lawsuit, you need action now. You should be doing things to protect yourself NOW. Our debt defense system gives people what they need to defend themselves.

You can beat them. It’s mostly a question of knowing what you need to do and doing that thing throughout the lawsuit. At the same time, not doing the things you should not do is equally important. It sounds simple, and it is – if you know what you’re doing.  You can know those things with the Debt Defense System and get help doing the right things while avoiding the wrong ones.

You have probably heard of the saying, “inch by inch it’s a cinch.”

Defending a lawsuit is never actually a cinch. However, debt defense just requires a series of decisions and steps. These are steps that anybody with some determination can take. You can do them well enough to do a good job  overall of defending. And that is usually good enough to win.

I have had a great deal of experience both as a litigator and web master. Over the years, I’ve realized that almost everyone representing himself or herself in a debt case does much better with an opportunity to talk to other people facing the same issues.  People can help each other with insights and information. Seeing a variety of samples is helpful as well.  The Debt Defense System, gets you a membership which gets you the full resources of Your Legal Leg Up’s website and  our weekly teleconferences.

 

Verification of Debt – Don’t Let the Right Turn You into a Sucker

Don’t be a Verification Sucker – Request for Verification is NOT a Substitute for an Answer

 

Debt verification (also called “validation”) of your debt is an important right. If the debt collector brings suit, though, it’s too late. Demanding validation will NOT prevent a default judgment if you try it after the debt collector brings suit. In fact, a lawsuit does NOT trigger the right to verification at all.

People in debt trouble hear a lot about debt validation, and it can be a valuable right. Even though it requires little from the debt collector, making the demand seems to cause some debt collectors to go away. It will at least send a signal to the debt collector that you will defend your rights.

If the debt collector has filed suit, you must defend the lawsuit and file an answer (or appropriate motion) in court. If you don’t answer, the debt collector usually gets a default judgment. That effectively ends your rights to fight the debt.

That’s because, under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), filing suit is not an “initial contact” for purposes of verification. Validation is designed to keep debt collectors from suing the wrong people. After they file suit, it’s too late for that. Instead, the courts will decide.

Or so goes the legal precedent. The debt collectors know – and we all know – that most people do not protect themselves in court.

Make sure you do. You have to file an answer or the appropriate motion to do this.

Conclusion

When a debt collector (or creditor) files suit against you, you will have to file an answer in court to avoid a default judgment. Many people think all they have to do is “dispute the debt and request verification.” The right to verification, however, applies only to collection efforts that are not part of a lawsuit. Don’t be a verification sucker – file an Answer and defend yourself.

Counterclaim When Sued for Debt: Important for Your Defense


Filing a counterclaim is probably the single most important thing you can do in defending yourself from a lawsuit brought by a debt collector. In this article and video, we discuss the importance of filing a counterclaim in general and whether you can do so in your case.

Counterclaim – Why So Important?

In most jurisdictions, which is a fancy way of saying most courts and places, the person bringing the lawsuit is allowed to drop the case  if it want to. And usually at any time it wants to. This isn’t true of federal court, where you have to get permission, but in most state courts it seems to be true. And debt cases are pretty much always brought in state courts.

That means that the debt collector could get tired of you and just dismiss the case at any time.

That’s cool! That’s just what we want and what I’ve been saying you should go for, right?

Yes, but if the debt collector simply dismisses your case, it could also sue you again later. Or it could sell the debt to someone else who would sue you later, and that is definitely not cool! You need the case dismissed “with prejudice” to keep it from coming back. You also need it dismissed with prejudice if you want to repair your credit report.

Counterclaims Give you Some Control

So how do you keep them from dismissing the suit and refiling the suit later? You do this by filing a counterclaim against them. A plaintiff can dismiss its own claim against you, but not your claim against it.

Unless you agree.

If you have a counterclaim, if they want to dismiss the case against you they either have to settle the case with you, or they’re still left defending your counterclaim. They never do that, because then they’d be bound to lose money one way or another. They’d either have to pay you or their lawyers (or both) — without the chance of collecting anything from you. They won’t do that. Instead, they’ll settle the whole case with you.

So a counterclaim gives you power over the plaintiff and lets you keep it around till they agree to destroy the debt (or “extinguish” it, as it is called). A counterclaim means you can put the harassment to an end. And sometimes your counterclaim can be worth a lot more than their lawsuit against you was in the first place.

Who Can File a Counterclaim

Counterclaiming became more complicated in 2017 thanks to an important Supreme Court ruling. Two things are necessary for you to file one: some legal wrong, and a “debt collector.” The legal wrong under the FDCPA is pretty broad and includes fundamental unfairness or deception. But whether the person suing you is a debt collector under the Act is more complicated.

To help figure out whether you have a counterclaim against a debt collector, go here. Who is a Debt Collector after Santander.