Category Archives: debt trouble

Cease-Communication Letters – Make Debt Collectors Leave you Alone

Cease-Communication Letters

Debt collectors often try to wear down the resistance of consumers by repeatedly calling and harassing them. If this is happening, you can easily make it stop with a cease communication letter. Here’s how.

They’re Trying to Harass You

Debt collectors know that the people they are calling do not have much money – their purpose in harassing you is to move themselves to the head of the line. The way they do this is by attempting to inflict more pain or annoyance on you than other bill collectors. In other words, debt collectors know you only have so much money to pay your bills – they’re competing with each other. The company that harasses you the most “wins.”

Among other things, this means you should never take what they say personally. But you don’t have to put up with it.

Sometimes individual debt collectors claim not to engage in abusive behavior, but rather to be the victims of it. I leave the reader to decide how much sympathy these debt collectors deserve. My point is that, in general, the debt collectors seek emotional engagement. That is, they want you to take what they’re saying personally and to dispute or argue about it.

In general, the best thing you can do is avoid paying any attention to them. Write them a cease communication letter.

You Can Make them Stop Bugging You

The collectors are not concerned with your priorities or well-being, but you should be. It can be hard to keep a clear head amidst all the noise and all the people trying to use you. Luckily the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) offers some help. Under the FDCPA, 15 U.S. Code Section 1692(c)c,

“if a consumer notifies a debt collector in writing that the consumer wishes [it] to cease further communication with the consumer, the debt collector shall not communicate further…with respect to such debt.”

However, the collector may inform the consumer that it’s efforts are being terminated, or notify the consumer that it “may or will invoke specified remedies which are ordinarily invoked” (i.e., suing or reporting to the credit agencies). They can tell you that once, but then they have to leave you alone.

Many people fear that by invoking this rule they will cause the debt collectors to sue them. This fear is misplaced. The debt collectors have their own guidelines based on what they expect to collect. That is, they may sue you, if you fit within their guidelines, but making them leave you alone is not one of those guidelines (that I’ve ever observed).

If anything, writing a cease communication letter may reduce your chance of being sued because it keeps the debt collector from gathering more information about you. Lawyers dislike uncertainty. They want to be pretty sure they’re going to make money if they go to the trouble of suing you. Your talking to them is one way they find out what they need in order to decide to sue you. Making them leave you alone leaves them in the dark.

What to Do to Make Debt Collectors Stop Harassing You

Crucially, if the cease communication notification is made by U.S. mail, the communication is complete “upon receipt.” In other words, to make sure the debt collector is forced to leave you alone, it makes sense (although it is not required by the law) to send the letter by certified mail. That way you have proof that the debt collector received the letter and when it received it. Any further communication would be in violation of the FDCPA.

When the phones stop ringing off the hook, you will be freer to make decisions according to your own best interests and priorities.

For More Help

If you would like a product that gives you more information on whether the cease-communication letter or the debt validation letter would work for you and be a good idea, along with sample letters that really work, click here. 

Check out our Guide to Legal Research and Analysis for a guide to researching and laws and cases in the most effective way. But legal research is more about what you do with what you find, and so this is a primer on legal thinking and analysis as well.

Two Hidden “Legal” Risks of Debt Consolidation Loans

Debt consolidation is combining outstanding loans (debt) into a single package (consolidation). The debts therefore become one “new” loan, and instead of making several small payments on the loans you used to have, you make one larger payment on the new loan.

Occasionally people ask whether debt consolidation is a good, economically constructive solution to credit card problems. Usually, the answer is that it is not. Certainly not as a solution all by itself. This article discusses some of the drawbacks of debt consolidation.

Debt Consolidation Loans

Ideally and typically—and what has made debt consolidation loans popular—the new, consolidated, loan is secured by some asset, often your home. This allows you to obtain lower interest rates. Thus consolidation, in the  final analysis, is the conversion of unsecured debt into secured debt in exchange for lower interest rates. It can reduce your monthly payments considerably, and of course that could be very helpful.

It also converts “old” loans into new loans, giving them a new statute of limitations (new life for loans that could be at or near their time of expiring). Consolidating debts you haven’t paid for quite a while is probably a bad idea for this reason.

Consolidation can even turn loans with short statutes of limitations into loans with long ones. This isn’t necessarily bad, but it does increase your general level of legal risk.

Why Doesn’t Debt Consolidation “Work?”

Debt collection is seldom the solution people hope it will be. If you hare having trouble paying your bills, it won’t necessarily make your life any easier. Why?

It’s a question of risk.

Economics

As a pure financial transaction, exchanging a lower interest rate for a security arrangement can be a very reasonable decision. Why then has it been such a disaster for so many people?

Most people entering into complex financing are not able to assess risk and account for it. This is particularly true when they are under economic pressure—which they usually are when they consider debt consolidation loans. Thus people systematically underestimate the risk that they won’t be able to make the payments on the new debt.

Additionally, since most people do not really want to go far into debt in the first place, large credit card debt suggests other problems, either too little money or a tendency to overspend. These issues are more likely to be made worse by the sudden reduction of economic pressure and the sudden, apparently greater amount of money or credit available to be spent. Loan consolidation, like winning the lottery, encourages reckless spending.

The Hidden Legal Risks of Debt Consolidation

In addition to these “systemic” issues, there are two other main hidden costs of consolidation you should consider: loss of flexibility, and the nature of secured debt versus unsecured debt.

Consolidated Loans are Less Flexible

When you have ten loans for different things, from automobiles to credit cards, you have flexibility if hard times strike. If you simply cannot make your payments, you can give up some, but not all, of the things you have purchased. You can let some, but not all of the credit cards go into default.

This is certainly not a happy thing, of course, but it raises the possibility of individualized debt negotiations, debt forgiveness, or even missed statutes of limitation. Again, these are not the choices and hopes of someone in flush economic conditions, but they are real options facing many people right now.

In order for a debt collector to start garnishing your wages, it must find and sue you, must win, and then find your assets. It is an expensive and risky process for the debt collector if you fight. They sometimes drop the ball, and there are limits to how much of your wages they can garnish.

If everything else fails for you, you can declare bankruptcy, where homestead exemptions are likely to allow you to remain in your home.

The Nature of Secured Debt

The risk of debt consolidation loans is the nature of secured, versus unsecured, debt. Remember that what powers the lower payments for consolidation is the existence of security—usually your home. Your home secures the debt, and that means that if you do not make your payments on the new debt, the lender can foreclose on your home and take it away.

Foreclosures are generally “expedited” proceedings, meaning that your defenses are limited and the time for asserting them is restricted. In many states foreclosure is not even a judicial proceeding, although you have some legal rights you could assert in certain circumstances.

And what all that means is that instead of facing the prospect of years of battling over high-risk debts and questionable payoffs that could be trumped by bankruptcy, the banks can waltz into court and emerge in a very short time with your house. Put a little differently, your debt consolidation loan could make you homeless almost before you know it. And bankruptcy often, if not usually, will do nothing to protect you from it.

Anyone considering debt consolidation should think about these risks very carefully.

Garnishment of Assets by Debt Collectors

debt collectors garnish your wages? What about bank accounts? Here are some things you need to know about garnishment.

If you have assets, and this includes either a job or money in the bank, you must be concerned about the possibility of the debt collector finding and garnishing your money. The risk exists if a debt collector (or anybody else) has a judgment against you.

Governments can levy even without a judgment. Our discussion here focuses on private debt collectors, however.

Bank Accounts

Debt collectors can seize and garnish bank accounts and, when they do, it is almost always comes as a surprise to the debtor. What typically happens is collectors obtain money judgments (usually by default) and then use the judgment to freeze the funds in your bank account.

No Notice of Bank Garnishment

State law and banking rules govern how the bank must handle the garnishment process. Collectors always notify the bank first and then notify the debtor. This way your funds are frozen before you can take any action such as withdrawing all your funds.

Their notifying the bank first is perfectly legal. You typically receive the notice (including your rights) a few days after your funds have been frozen. In most states, the garnishment can only freeze funds already in your account at the time of service on the financial institution. During the time the garnishment is in effect, the financial institution cannot honor checks or other orders for the payment of money drawn against your account.

This means any outstanding checks will more than likely bounce or be returned for NSF (non-sufficient funds). In other words, your checks will bounce. The exception to this rule is if your account has more on deposit than the amount of the garnishment. In this case, the bank can honor checks up to the amount that will reduce your funds below the amount of the garnishment. When the amount being garnished is paid, the freeze on your account must be terminated.

Wages

Debt collectors can also garnish your wages. Again, your first notice that they are garnishing you is likely to be when you receive a check that is less than you thought it would be. Federal law limits the maximum amount they can take to 25 percent of your disposable earnings for that week, or the amount by which disposable earnings for that week exceed thirty times the Federal minimum hourly wage, whichever is less. In simple terms, “disposable income” is whatever money you have left after paying all required taxes and national insurances!

Disposable income is after-tax income that is  the difference between personal income and personal tax and nontax payments. In general terms, personal tax and nontax payments are about 15% of personal income. That makes disposable personal income about 85% of personal income. IMPORTANT: In order for wages to be garnished, disposable earnings per week must exceed thirty times the federal minimum hourly wage.  (That’s $154.50 at the time of this writing.)

Put another way, if you make $154.50 or less per week your wages are immune from garnishment – for now and as long as you don’t make any more than that. Also – most debt collectors can never garnish Social Security and some other types of disability or retirement income.

But You Should Not Let them Get a Judgment if Possible

Even if you have nothing for the debt collectors to garnish, you will almost always be much better off it you don’t let them get a judgment against you. Things could get better for you in any number of ways. So they might eventually be able to garnish you when that happens if you let them have a judgment. Remember that just because things may seem bleak now doesn’t mean that the sun won’t eventually shine. When it does, you don’t want debt collectors to take your good luck away from you.

And it isn’t all that hard to keep them from getting a judgment if you know what you’re doing.

 

Requiring Verification of the Debt – Secret Weapon against Debt Collectors

Verification is not difficult for debt collectors, but it can be a key right for people with debt problems.

When a debt collector first contacts you, it should notify you of your right to “dispute and request verification.” That right is provided by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). This video explains why you should dispute the debt and require the debt collector to verify it.

In other words, always seek verification  Often a debt collector will either disappear completely once you seek verification or will fail to provide verification but still harass you – a violation of the FDCPA.

But remember this does not apply if they file suit against you – if you don’t answer a lawsuit when it is filed, you will lose the case. See Bogus Right to Verification on Petition – Dirty Trick! If you have already sought verification but not received it, you might file a motion to dismiss based on their failure to verify.

Your Right to Dispute a Debt

If a debt collector contacts you in an attempt to collect a debt, you have a right to dispute the debt. To be precise, you should receive written notice of that right within five days of the first communication. And the notice should tell you that you have a right to demand verification within thirty days. That is, you must make your request to them within thirty days.

If you do, they must verify the debt before taking any further actions to collect it from you. They don’t have to do anything within thirty days – they never have to verify the debt if they don’t want to . It’s just that until they do so, it’s illegal to try to get you to pay it.

If you have disputed the debt.

What IS Verification?

What constitutes verification is a gray area in the law. The FDCPA does not specify what it is.  The courts have taken a pretty non-demanding view of verification. It is intended mostly to prevent clerical-type errors leading to suing or harassing the wrong person. So in reality it takes very little to verify the debt. Debt collectors often offer nothing more than copies of old statements. Absent some sort of more specific challenge to the debt, that seems to be enough.

What could be a more specific challenge? Suppose you wrote and disputed a debt to you, Tom Jones. You say, “my middle name is Jim, and I never sigh without including my middle name.” In that case, sending you statements with the name “Tom Jones” on them might not be enough. They probably would not be. Likewise, a challenge to address or some other specific would probably need to be addressed by the verification. Does that make sense?

What Good Does Demanding Verification Do?

There are three good reasons to demand verification. Sometimes they go away. Sometimes they give you helpful information. And sometimes they ignore the law.

Sometimes they Go Away

Surprisingly, giving how easy it is to verify a debt, demanding verification often causes debt collectors to go away.  Perhaps it is only because you have signaled a willingness to assert your rights. Possibly in some transactions the debt collector lacks even this much evidence. Or more likely the debt collector is playing a simple numbers game and any friction whatever causes it to punt. For whatever reason, though, it seems to happen often enough to justify making the demand every time.

Sometimes they Give you Helpful Information

Rarely, a debt collector will simply give you everything it has in response to a verification demand. This allows you to think carefully about whether they could prove the debt. Usually you will see that they cannot. In any event, in some cases you can get what they have without a fight, whereas when you seek discovery in a lawsuit you will have to fight for everything. So it can be easy discovery.

Sometimes they Ignore the Law

Debt collectors used to ignore verification demands quite often. It seems that they don’t do that as much anymore, but this could simply be my limited observation. In any event, if they ignore the law and continue to harass you, you have the right to sue them under the FDCPA.

If they are suing you, you have a right to counterclaim against them under the FDCPA. This is the same right you have to sue them, only it happens differently because they have sued you first.

You probably have a right to move to dismiss the case as well. The point of verification is to prevent wasteful and harmful lawsuits. If they ignore the law and bring suit without verifying, a court should be willing to dismiss the suit until they obey the law.

Conclusion

If a debt collector is bugging you, you should demand verification. It costs little effort and might gain you something.

 

Should You Give a Debt Collector Money? And What Happens if You Do?

Debt collectors are trained to to intimidate or manipulate the people they call. Should you ever give a debt collector money? and what are the legal effects if you do so?

Giving them money can be a big mistake.

Giving them Money Encourages Debt Collectors

Many people have a natural impulse to bargain with debt collectors. They hope if they give a collector money they’ll go away. This does not work.

The person calling you is a low-level employee. Usually the caller will have no power at all to make any kind of deal with you. Or they will have some limited power to accept delays or offer a small discount. On the other hand, the caller’s salary will depend to some extent on getting you to pay. If you offer anything – a promise or a payment – you guarantee that they’ll call you many more times. You are sending a clear signal that they can push you over.

Of course, it costs practically nothing to call you, so any encouragement whatsoever means endless calls in the future. Giving them nothing does not mean they’ll stop calling, however.

Legal Effects of Payments

If you give a debt collector money the legal impact is even worse than just calling them. if the debt is so old that the statute of limitations does or might soon protect you, your payment can restart the clock. If you were disputing the debt, the court might take your payment as an admission that you owe it.

And if the debt collector lacks any means of proving the debt in any way, your payment will help them past any problem.

You Can Still Fight

That isn’t to say that you have lost everything if you made a payment. You still have a chance to win if they sue you. But every payment makes the road harder.

 

Hardship Applications and Debt Collectors

Hardship Applications with Debt Collectors – Beware Anything that Requires you to Give them Information about your Assets

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 Debt Collector Hardship Applications


Sometimes debt collectors pretend to care whether you can afford to pay them, or whether they should “give you a break.” If they send you a “hardship application,” you should consider very carefully whether or not to send it back. It could possibly have some value to you, but the stories we hear are not encouraging. And we’re suspicious of anything that would give the debt collector information about you.

Inability to Pay is not a Defense in Debt Law

The first thing you must remember about “hardship” is this. No amount of financial difficulty (for a debtor) is a legal excuse to avoid paying a legitimate debt. And that means that the debt collectors won’t be considering whether you have a RIGHT to a break. They won’t even consider whether you should get one or not in some more esoteric question of fairness or rightness. No.

The question the debt collector will be asking is simply whether you have assets they can get to MAKE you pay. As we have often written, uncertainty is a great concern of the debt collectors and their lawyers. Perhaps THE great concern. Thus we have always suggested that you not respond to them in any way or provide them any information at all. If their hardship application process leads them to your bank accounts or job information, the net effect will be to make it easier and more likely for them to snatch your money rather than to spare you.

Information in Litigation


Debt Collectors never really worry about losing their lawsuit against you. And they sure as heck don’t worry about whether suing you is compassionate or fair. Their main, and usually only, concern is with getting your money. And this means that the one real thing they’re worried about is whether you have anything to take from you and figuring out how to do that.

If you tell them about assets, you not only make your case far more valuable in their eyes, but you subject yourself to the risk of instant seizure or garnishment if they get a judgment against you. We encourage people not to talk to debt collectors at all.

If You Really Have Nothing

If you really have nothing – no assets beyond a monthly payment from Social Security or welfare, and no equity in your home, and no other identifiable assets or expectations – it might make sense to share that information with the debt collector. And even then I would be reluctant to identify any specific bank accounts. Even if they contain exclusively Social Security assets, you could find yourself working to keep them and in a bad spot.

I’m not aware of anyone who actually received a “hardship” break. But even this would be a Trojan Horse – more trouble than it’s worth – in all likelihood. When a creditor (including in this case debt collectors) “forgives” a debt (let’s you out of it), it can file a form 1099S. This does extinguish the debt collector’s right to collect, but also informs the I.R.S. that the debt is forgiven. The I.R.S. treats that forgiven debt as income and will come after you for tax. If you beat the debt collector in a lawsuit, on the other hand, your chances of owing taxes on the money are much smaller.

Protect Your Rights

If you are being contacted by debt collectors, you need to be alert to protect your rights. These calls are often a prelude to their suing you. You might consider membership with our site, which gets you our ecourses for free, plus gives you many other benefits.Check out some of our e-courses. Or consider our prepaid legal plan to protect you from future possible litigation. With that, if you get sued, you’ll get a lawyer to defend you for free.

 

What if I Really (Think) I Owe the Money?

What If I Really Do Owe the Money?

Or Think I Do?

Think you owe

What if a debt collector sues you for a debt and think you really owe the money? Should you defend yourself from the suit?

Debt collectors often sue the wrong people and usually overcharge. If you don’t defend, you run the risk of having to pay twice. And if you do defend yourself, you probably won’t have to pay at all. If that bothers you, give the money to somebody who really needs it.

Most People Debt Collectors Sue May Actually Owe Someone Some Money

 

If a debt collector is suing you, you probably think you owe them the money. Or think you owe someone the money, although it’s surprising how often people who do NOT owe anybody any money get sued. If that’s you – you still need to fight the case, it won’t go away by itself. But if you actually do owe somebody the money for which you are being sued, you still need to be careful.

And you should still defend yourself as well as you can.

You must make the debt collector prove every part of its case. This includes not only that you owe the money, but that you owe it to them. And exactly how much you supposedly owe. That’s because old debts get sold – often more than once – and if you don’t make the debt collector prove it owns the debt, you may pay the wrong person. And then you might have to pay again if the person that actually owns the debt sues you.

In addition, most people do not owe what the debt collectors are trying to collect. They routinely add fees and interest they should not, and consumer protections agencies and organizations say that almost all debt collection suits include extra charges. Many of them are for far more than is owed.

The Good News

The good news about debt collectors is that they usually CANNOT prove their cases if you make put them to the test. The whole process by which they get these debts is so sloppy and careless that they usually cannot find or obtain the proof that they need to win their case. IF you defend yourself.

Get Help

If you would like us to take a look at your case and give you a sort of roadmap to what you need to do and how, take a look at our Personalized Evaluation product. If a debt collector is suing you and you know you want to defend yourself without spending a lot of money on lawyers, then get out Debt Defense System.

Protect Your Rights

If debt collectors are harassing you, you need to be alert to protect your rights. These calls are often a prelude to their suing you. You might consider membership with our site, which gets you our ecourses for free, plus gives you many other benefits.Check out some of our e-courses. Or consider our prepaid legal plan to protect you from future possible litigation. With that, if they do sue you, you’ll get a lawyer to defend you for free.

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Partial Payment to Debt Collectors a Terrible Idea

partial payment can destroy your rights
Never Make a Partial Payment

Making Partial Payment Can Kill Your Right to Defend

Partial payment can seem like such a good way to make a debt collector go away, but don’t do it.

Debt collectors love getting people to make “partial payments” on debts – on any debts, but especially old ones. It isn’t just that they want some money, any money. If you give them the money you will probably be subjecting yourself to a lot of problems. And that is especially true if the debt is very old, even if it is beyond statutes of limitations.

Partial Payments Revive Dead Debts

If your debt is beyond the statute of limitations – that is, if it is too late for the debt collector to sue you – making a partial payment will revive the debt and start the life of the debt again. This is because of an odd thing about the law – it distinguishes between the life of the debt (forever unless paid) and enforceability of a debt (the right to sue to collect, controlled by statutes of limitations). To put that into plain English, the law regards a debt as continuing to exist until it is either paid or excused in some way even if it is long past the statute of limitations. And this little bit of B.S. allows for all kinds of unethical mischief by debt collectors.

It allows debt collectors in some jurisdictions to raid bankruptcy claims even though the debts would be illegal to try to collect, and it allows for the revival of debts by a debtor making a simple mistake. If you offer a gift, for example, that promise is not enforceable because there is nothing paid for it. Giving a debt collector partial payment will put you back on the hook for the entire amount.

Unless you make a signed written agreement that you are settling the claim for the amount paid, partial payments are a terrible idea. But of course what the debt collectors tell you is that you can pay a little now and then a little later if you get a chance. Wrong. Make that payment and they’ll be after you as hard as they can go.

Partial Payments Restart the Clock

Similarly, if the debt is old and you make a payment, it restarts the statute of limitations. I do not think it should do that if the payment does not, at least, take the debt out of default, but the courts haven’t listened to me on that one. Make a payment on an old debt and, voila, you have a new debt.

Don’t Pay Unless You Have a Plan

So with all that in mind, what do you do? I would suggest that there’s never a moral reason to pay a debt collector – it’s like feeding rats, and do you really want them to multiply? But there could be times when you might want to either for moral or practical reasons. If so, you must know what you’re doing. Your payment will revive the debt. Do you know how you will pay it? Do you have a reason to pay the whole thing? I would be extremely cautious in this as you are subjecting yourself to liability to a group of people more willing to destroy you than almost any other group.

I’d say don’t do it 99.99% of the time.

Protect Your Rights

Even if you are reading this article late in the game, shortly before trial, and you are not already a member, you should consider doing so. We have materials helpful to last minute defense and trial preparation even if you are facing this rule.

If it’s a little earlier in the lawsuit, or if no suit has yet been filed, you have many other options. Membership can present you many benefits and help you win your case. Or you could check out some of our e-courses.

 

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Social Security Recipients in Danger of Garnishment by Collectors

Social Security recipients face a risk not only from their own debt troubles but also those of  the people that take care of them. If you receive Social Security or take care of someone who does, you should know about this.

 

Secret Danger of Garnishment to Social Security Recipients and Others

As I have pointed out in my video about garnishing Social Security, Social Security benefits are exempt from most forms of garnishment. The notable exceptions to that rule is that they may be garnished by certain government entities and for child support.

Although Social Security benefits are exempt from most forms of garnishment, collectors sometimes attach and take them. When a collector garnishes a bank account,  the bank holds the funds for a time to allow you to fight the garnishment. In plain English, they “freeze” the account, and you can’t get your money.

As a practical matter, you may be unable to fight the garnishment. Thus if you have paid for bills with an account that holds Social Security benefits, it makes  sense to switch those benefits to another bank if that creditor later gets a judgment against you. Once they get a judgment, the debt collector will look for your assets. It will try to garnish any assets in a bank they have on file for you.

I realize this can be difficult or disruptive, but if you have paid an original creditor or debt collector out of an account, you must expect that account to be garnished – seized and taken away from you – if the debt collector manages to get a judgment.

If the debt collectors seized an account,  you may or may not be able to get the money back. There will certainly be a delay, and all the money in the account, up to the amount of the judgment, will be held by the bank and unavailable to you.

Debt collectors sometimes garnish the accounts of Social Security recipients because of their caretakers.

Social Security recipients are often elderly or disabled, needless to say. Many of these people need other people to do shopping for them. Or to hold their assets in one way or another to use for their benefit. This money is held in trust and should not be available to debt collectors going for the caretaker’s money.

Here is an example that might make it clearer. Assume that Tom is taking care of Mary, his 70 year old mother. She suffers from Altzheimer’s. Mary and Tom will frequently find it helpful to allow Tom to use Mary’s account to pay her bills. If Mary’s account contains only Social Security benefits, it should be beyond the reach of any creditor. And because the money is not Tom’s at all, it should never be reachable by Tom’s creditors.

However, sometimes debt collectors will discover that Tom is paying bills using Mary’s account.  If his name is on the account, or if he writes checks upon it, the debt collectors may attempt to garnish the account.

This is not as “evil” as it may first appear. From the debt collector’s point of view, how do they know what bills Tom is paying with the account? People often hide assets from debt collectors by using other people’s accounts. The law lets creditors go after the debtor’s money regardless of whose name it is in.

On the other hand, the impact on Mary of seizing her account for Tom’s debt can be devastating. Remember, the banks will freeze the account for a while to determine whether the debt collector can take it. During that time, the elderly person cannot pay her bills. She may be evicted, be unable to pay for medicine, or face other, life-threatening and disrupting events.

Get Legal Advice

If there is a judgment against you, seek the advice of a lawyer specializing in debt collection before linking anyone’s accounts to you in any way. In my opinion, the risk extends beyond just having your name on the account. If you sign checks for someone else and have a judgment against you, you may be putting this person at risk. Get legal advice and protect them and you.