Requiring Verification of the Debt – Secret Weapon against Debt Collectors

Verification is not difficult for debt collectors, but it can be a key right for people with debt problems.

When a debt collector first contacts you, it should notify you of your right to “dispute and request verification.” That right is provided by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). This video explains why you should dispute the debt and require the debt collector to verify it.

In other words, always seek verification  Often a debt collector will either disappear completely once you seek verification or will fail to provide verification but still harass you – a violation of the FDCPA.

But remember this does not apply if they file suit against you – if you don’t answer a lawsuit when it is filed, you will lose the case. See Bogus Right to Verification on Petition – Dirty Trick! If you have already sought verification but not received it, you might file a motion to dismiss based on their failure to verify.

Your Right to Dispute a Debt

If a debt collector contacts you in an attempt to collect a debt, you have a right to dispute the debt. To be precise, you should receive written notice of that right within five days of the first communication. And the notice should tell you that you have a right to demand verification within thirty days. That is, you must make your request to them within thirty days.

If you do, they must verify the debt before taking any further actions to collect it from you. They don’t have to do anything within thirty days – they never have to verify the debt if they don’t want to . It’s just that until they do so, it’s illegal to try to get you to pay it.

If you have disputed the debt.

What IS Verification?

What constitutes verification is a gray area in the law. The FDCPA does not specify what it is.  The courts have taken a pretty non-demanding view of verification. It is intended mostly to prevent clerical-type errors leading to suing or harassing the wrong person. So in reality it takes very little to verify the debt. Debt collectors often offer nothing more than copies of old statements. Absent some sort of more specific challenge to the debt, that seems to be enough.

What could be a more specific challenge? Suppose you wrote and disputed a debt to you, Tom Jones. You say, “my middle name is Jim, and I never sigh without including my middle name.” In that case, sending you statements with the name “Tom Jones” on them might not be enough. They probably would not be. Likewise, a challenge to address or some other specific would probably need to be addressed by the verification. Does that make sense?

What Good Does Demanding Verification Do?

There are three good reasons to demand verification. Sometimes they go away. Sometimes they give you helpful information. And sometimes they ignore the law.

Sometimes they Go Away

Surprisingly, giving how easy it is to verify a debt, demanding verification often causes debt collectors to go away.  Perhaps it is only because you have signaled a willingness to assert your rights. Possibly in some transactions the debt collector lacks even this much evidence. Or more likely the debt collector is playing a simple numbers game and any friction whatever causes it to punt. For whatever reason, though, it seems to happen often enough to justify making the demand every time.

Sometimes they Give you Helpful Information

Rarely, a debt collector will simply give you everything it has in response to a verification demand. This allows you to think carefully about whether they could prove the debt. Usually you will see that they cannot. In any event, in some cases you can get what they have without a fight, whereas when you seek discovery in a lawsuit you will have to fight for everything. So it can be easy discovery.

Sometimes they Ignore the Law

Debt collectors used to ignore verification demands quite often. It seems that they don’t do that as much anymore, but this could simply be my limited observation. In any event, if they ignore the law and continue to harass you, you have the right to sue them under the FDCPA.

If they are suing you, you have a right to counterclaim against them under the FDCPA. This is the same right you have to sue them, only it happens differently because they have sued you first.

You probably have a right to move to dismiss the case as well. The point of verification is to prevent wasteful and harmful lawsuits. If they ignore the law and bring suit without verifying, a court should be willing to dismiss the suit until they obey the law.

Conclusion

If a debt collector is bugging you, you should demand verification. It costs little effort and might gain you something.